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Topics - Steve Wood

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 17
1
General Auto Tech / Is Earl's Screen Name
« on: July 21 2019, 11:35:46 AM »
Dirty Sanchez? Good thread and it's written like Earl would write.

https://advrider.com/f/threads/loctite.265016/page-2

2
General Buick Tech / Earl Brown! Rear Main Seal Install
« on: July 20 2019, 11:57:23 PM »
Earl, I have been waiting for some magical being to come along and do the rear mains on both my Buicks.  Beginning to lose hope and am thinking about sucking it up and doing it myself.

I see several ways suggested it can be done, but the more I read, the more questions I have.

I started with http://www.gnttype.org/techarea/engine/rearmain.html as a basis.

Okay, assuming it get the old cap off and clean it up so it's oil-free, then:

Using a rubber seal (dry according to Fel-Pro) and installing it cocked .

Now my questions begin.

Some say to apply a paper thin layer of anaerobic sealer to the mating surfaces, install the cap, and torque it down to 100 ft lbs, then inject the side cavities of the cap until the sealer seeps out.  YET, others say, lightly snug the cap, then inject the sealer in the side pockets til it's seeping out, and THEN torque the cap down to the 100 ft lb spec.

Okay, that suggests several questions.  First, torque it down it down all the way before filling the side pockets, or fill first, then torque, and inject some more in case there is room for more.

Second, what are your choices for sealer.  I was thinking Right Stuff because it is applied like a caulking gun.  Anaerobic sealer on the face or something else?

In other words, give me the Earl Brown procedure for a leak-proof future in details an old man can understand.  A picture where to apply the sealer between the cap and block would be nice as well if you have such.

Appreciate it!

3
General Buick Tech / Okay, Grumpy! Suspension question
« on: July 09 2019, 12:12:31 PM »
In the old days of four links, there was an opinion floating around that suggested that the lower control arms should be close to parallel to the ground and the upper bars should handle most of the adjustment.

In those days, there was not much available for G bodies.  Chuck made some drops for the rear of the lower control arms but they did not seem to take off.  I have a pair of them and on my GN, the rear end would rise up like a Mopar Super Stocker from the 'sixties and it would hook really well for a few feet and then it would come back down and unload.  My GN is lowered an inch with Eibach springs on both ends and it may be that this caused the instant center to be too far back and too high above the anti squat line.  I never tried them on my son's T top although I have been thinking about it for a few years  :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Later Kevin Slaby came along with some drops for the front of the uppers. I have no experience with them.

I see there are quite a few options out there today for drops with coil overs, and such.

Now, back to my question.  Is there any current opinion on the advisability of keeping the lowers close to parallel to the ground and using the uppers to establish the desired instant center, or does it really matter as long as it works and does not create instability when you stand on the brakes?

5
IHADAV8 Playground / Brad
« on: June 26 2019, 05:10:12 PM »
I understand that Brad's diabetes problems have affected his vision and he has not been able to read the Board lately.  Take care of yourself and get back with us as soon as you can!

I am not the only that misses you, my friend!

6
General Buick Tech / Shifter trim ring
« on: May 04 2019, 11:15:59 AM »
I am looking for the "chrome" trim ring that pops into the shifter handle over the "dummy" button on the right side.  Any one have an old handle laying around with this piece intact?

7
IHADAV8 Playground / Ed Baker's daughter
« on: February 06 2019, 08:04:26 PM »
Lost her battle with cancer today.  Ed has been away from the car business for several years taking care of her and his granddaughter. 

I have not talked to Ed since the fall when it told me that it did not look good, but, he is one of my closest friends in the car business.  He is a real car guy that has always helped everyone that he could. I don't understand why such bad things happen to the best of people.

My heart goes out to him, his granddaughter, and the rest of his family. 

8
IHADAV8 Playground / National Healthcare
« on: February 02 2019, 10:00:53 PM »
This does not sound at all like the glowing reviews of Canadian health Care that I hear here but it sounds exactly like what my Canadian employees told in 2000.

'Medicare-for-all' means long waits for poor care, and Americans won't go for it once they learn these facts

https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/medicare-for-all-means-long-waits-for-poor-care-and-americans-wont-go-for-it-once-they-learn-these-facts

9
IHADAV8 Playground / Happy Birthday, David!
« on: January 16 2019, 09:19:33 AM »
I hope the Polar Vortex Express gives you a pass today and you can celebrate a great birthday!  I still remember being a kid!  :D

10
IHADAV8 Playground / Happy Birthday, John!
« on: January 06 2019, 05:21:17 PM »
In memory of a Canadian that had the sense to become an American and avoid all those taxes and tariffs!  Happy Birthday, a week late, John Garand!  The father of the greatest battle rifle of the 20th century :rock:

11
General Auto Tech / Bottle Honing and Break in Oil
« on: October 13 2018, 10:37:26 PM »
I have heard a jillion times that bottle hones were useless and I have seen them used more than once by some good engine builders

https://www.onallcylinders.com/2018/04/13/ask-away-with-jeff-smith-bottle-brush-honing-vs-machining-cylinders-on-used-engine-blocks/

Most of the problems I have seen with honing came from trying to remove too much metal with the hone which resulted in burnishing the surface.  I suspect other problems came from failure to clean the cylinders well enuf after the process but no one ever admitted to that :D

12
General Buick Tech / Camshafts for turbo'd engines
« on: September 07 2018, 11:10:32 AM »
I stuck a link in the shout box a few weeks ago that no one took notice of.

It seems, according to  Comp, that modern turbos don't have nearly the high back pressure that the older units did so camshaft design is very similar to naturally aspirated engines.  That seems to explain why conventional camshafts seem to perform so well on today's fast cars.  For those that rail about the need to get modern with regard to camshaft selection so we don't leave all that power behind, it appears your time is past altho I know there are a couple that think they are smarter than Comp engineers :D

https://www.enginelabs.com/engine-tech/the-differences-between-turbocharger-supercharger-and-nitrous-cams/

https://www.dragzine.com/tech-stories/power-adders/video-turbo-cams-101-science-turbo-specific-camshaft-designs/

13
General Buick Tech / Okay, Tcorgn6-fix the blower high speed!
« on: August 21 2018, 07:41:24 PM »
Pull the connector off the blower relay. It's the relay that has an orange wire, a red wire, a dark blue wire, a black wire, and a purple wire going to it.

Now, with the key Off or ON, you should have power on the red wire at all times when you probe the connector side that it goes to.  That's because it comes from a fusible link that connects to the starter with all the other fusible links.  Check it with your meter or a test light.  If you do not have power there, then you have a blown fusible link.

If it does have power, be sure the key is ON in the run position and probe the the orange wire in the same connector.  It should show 12 volts on your meter or make the test light burn brightly.  If it does not have power, go to the connector I have been trying to get you to check for way too long :(  Normally it will have a burnt connection on the orange wire in the connection.  There is not much room to get to the connector but you will have to do it.  Look at the picture below.  It shows the location of the connector.  Those bolts are the hood hinge bolts.  It goes down in the inner fender right below and is in plain sight.






14
General Buick Tech / Power Seat Motor
« on: August 20 2018, 03:14:51 PM »
stopped at a car wash this morning and they moved the seat forward to vacuum.  that's when the seat motor decided it was time to strip the gear, or hopefully, break the coupler...'86 car

Is it possible to manually move the seat back so I can get a more normal driving position?

15
General Buick Tech / Window dew wipes-inner staples?
« on: August 03 2018, 10:20:56 AM »
The window fuzzy (not a fuzzy on our cars) is attached to the upper door panel with some staples...I wonder where you find replacements?  I have seen them advertised for Mustangs but not for our cars.

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